Review: Hulk vs. Thanos #1

(Marvel Comics, 2015)

Writer/Pencils- Jim Starlin
Inks- Andy Smith
Colors- Frank D’Armata

At this point even the casual comic book reader is familiar with the Infinity Gauntlet, at least by name; due mostly to its alluded to inclusion in the Marvel Cinematic Universe. Certainly there is no other writer more closely connected to that story and perhaps even the cosmic corner of the Marvel Universe than Jim Starlin. Starlin has dedicated more of his career to Thanos than any other character; beyond the various Infinity titles Starlin has penned several one shots, minis and even an original graphic novel featuring the exploits of the Mad Titan. So with that being the case I have to wonder why the big bad purple skinned villain occupies so few pages of this introductory issue allowing Pip the Troll to all but steal the show.

The idea of this story first came to light around the time Savage Hulk was launched. Marvel teased the concept of pitting these two Goliaths against one another with Starlin at the helm which would most likely mean the story would be set in the cosmic landscape of the Marvel U. Continue reading

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REVIEW: ‘Gonzo Cosmic’ #1

(Uthank Comics, 2013)

Review by Franco Romualdez

Written & Drawn by Garry Mac

I love science fiction. No other genre provides storytellers with such immense creative freedom. Some of the world’s greatest comic book heroes started out as, and are very much still products of science fiction. Some examples include the infamous Continue reading

REVIEW: ‘Aquaman’ #26

(DC Comics, 2013)

Review by Shawn Warner

Written by Jeff Parker
Pencils by Paul Pelletier & Netho Diaz
Inks by Sean Parsons
Color Artwork by Wil Quintana

If I had to personally pick Geoff Johns’ successor on Aquaman the series would have still ended up in the very capable hands of the extremely talented and prolific Jeff Parker. After reading Continue reading

‘Lost in the Longbox’, Episode 23: “Incredible Hulk” #378 (1991)

LostInTheLongbox-logo-2

The Incredible Hulk #378
(Marvel Comics, 1991)

Written by Peter David
Pencils by Bill Jaaska
Inks by Jeff Albrecht
Letters by Joe Rosen
Colors by Glynis Oliver

Greetings from the Wasteland!

Nothing brings that warm holiday feeling to your heart like the smell of fresh-baked cookies, a warm cup of coffee, and the slightly musty odor of an old comic, pulled freshly from its companions and brought to the counter, money in hand to add it to your own personal stash. Continue reading

REVIEW: “Infinity” #6

(Marvel Comics, 2013)

Review by Shawn Warner

Written by Jonathan Hickman
Pencils by Jim Cheung w/ Dustin Weaver
Inking by Mark Morales w/ Dustin Weaver, Guillermo Ortego,
Dave Meikis, Jim Cheung and John Livesay
Color Artwork by Justin Ponsor w/ Ive Svorcina

Jonathan Hickman has done what many thought impossible just a few issues ago, he has flawlessly brought together all of the numerous varied plot threads introduced over the past seventeen issues that have comprised the Infinity Event Continue reading

REVIEW: “Longshot Saves the Marvel Universe” #2

(Marvel Comics, 2013)

Review by Shawn Warner

Written by Christopher Hastings
Artwork by Jacopo Camagni
Cory Artwork by Matt Milla

I was so pleasantly surprised by how much I enjoyed the first issue of this mini-series that I requested to review #2 and after reading it, boy am I sorry I did. It seems that everything I liked so much about the first issue has dissipated and what remains is an inconsistent story with awkward looking art that at times borders on amateurish try-out level pages. Continue reading

REVIEW: “Indestructible Hulk” #4

(MARVEL NOW!, 2013)   –   Reviewed by Feral Fang

IndestructableHulk-no4I had been hearing a few hints and whispers about this title from all sorts of people and places, so I finally sat down with the first issue not too long ago and gave it a read.  I was very surprised at this title, and how fun it can be.  It isn’t “literature”, of course – I mean, it *is* the Hulk – but this title holds perfect ground between mindless SMASH and some pretty emotional drama.  Now we’re up to issue #4 which, while it may not be the best one so far, still holds testament to the idea that makes this title the oddly workable premise it is.  If you are new to this book, let me give you a quick run through: Bruce Banner has fully given in to the fact that he will never be rid of the Hulk, as everything that could possibly be tried to ‘cure’ him has been tried, and he sees no other options available of any kind.  Using a surprise meeting with S.H.I.E.L.D. Director Maria Hill (in a diner, of all places), he runs an idea by her – if S.H.I.E.L.D. supplies Banner with all of the tech, Lab space, and workers he needs to fully realize his potential as a scientist, he will allow them to use the Hulk as a form of ‘weapon’ – just drop him in, point him in the right direction, and hope he destroys what you sent him to destroy.  Banner sees this as a way to repay the world for all of the bad that Hulk has done over the years (as he says in this issue: “Hulk Breaks, Banner Builds”), while Maria Hill sees an interesting opportunity for S.H.I.E.L.D.  The arrangement is made, and Banner begins to assemble his work, Lab, and assistants, while he is sent as the Hulk to handle missions not suited or safe enough for any normal agent.  Oh, and eventually S.H.I.E.L.D. gives Bruce/Hulk a R.O.B. (Recording Observation Bot) to watch over him.  There really hasn’t been enough of this ‘character’ to know here nor there on my opinion of it.

A.I.M. had reactivated the Quintronic Man – a “walking weapon of mass destruction” that Hulk has had quite the problem with in the past – and Hulk took him down, no problem.  Now, Banner has the equally scary experience of meeting his new Lab Assistants, who may or may not be hiding interesting secrets and agendas.  Giving them the “Banner is about to Hulk-out, what do I do???” test (which they all pass without flinching), Banner makes the creepy statement that the Hulk “does happen” and, if he does “you can get to safety…if you run.”  To me that is what the whole book has been about – that fine line between Bruce and his other self, and the constant danger that, regardless of any helpful tech or other ways to curb his aggression, Banner can still become the Hulk at basically any time.  Even in the safest of situations, he is a constant wild card.  At this point in Banner’s life, it seems to have driven him to be a bit demented, maybe even darker.  His humor is more jaded, his attitude more direct, and his want to create rather than destroy almost seems fueled by nothing but a deep guilt and regret at what his life has become.  Now he wants that spot back, the Banner that he was before the accident.  His seeing the Hulk as a bargaining chip with S.H.I.E.L.D. tells a lot about how he views himself, especially in that form.  Expendable, unreliable, deadly and destructive.  He may act as if he has found a sort of peace with his ‘problem’, but to me he reads as if he’s really just attempting to separate himself from the beast, allowing it to run free under S.H.I.E.L.D.’s loose control without Banner being fully responsible for his actions.

After Banner runs his new team through the Hulk Test, he meets with Director Hill to discuss an undersea city known as Lemuria, a place previously known as more of a rumor than a reality.  Atlantean Warlord Attuma is attempting to seize control of the entire Pacific Ocean with the help of not only his impressive army and weaponry, but also giant sea monsters – ones that have been proven to originate from the legendary city.  Hulk, in a specialized (and very Sci-Fi looking) suit, is sent off to deal with this attack, and a cliffhanger ending wraps it up nicely, with Attuma sending Hulk to his ‘death’.  Which, of course, will *most likely* not be the case, but it’s still a fun cliffhanger to a great issue from one of new favorite titles.

WRITING:  7 / 10

ARTWORK:  7.5 / 10

COLOR ARTWORK: 8 / 10

OVERALL EXPERIENCE: 7 / 10

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