REVIEW: Winterworld #0

(IDW Publishing, 2015)

Written by Chuck Dixon
Art by Tommy Lee Edwards

I really enjoyed #0 issue of Winter World. I haven’t read up on the series so far, so this was my first foray into the Winter World. So many post-apocalyptic stories can seem so similar. Not this one. This one felt unique. Continue reading

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REVIEW: Orphan Black #2

(IDW Publishing, 2015)

Written by Graeme Manson and John Fawcett with Jody Houser
Art by Szymon Kudranski
Colors by Mat Lopes
Letters by Neil Uyetake

I am a tabula rasa when it comes to Orphan Black. I am, in fact, writing this forward before I’ve read either of the comics, numbers one or two, so that I can try to get a before and after impression. Continue reading

REVIEW: Star Trek/Planet of the Apes #3

(IDW Publishing / Boom! Studios, 2015)

Written by Scott and David Tipton
Art by Rachael Stott
Colors by Charlie Krichoff
Lettered by Tom B. Long

I was never a Trekkie. I never had that fanboy appreciation for the series or films that ensnares half of the geek culture. (because let’s face it, you’re either a Trek fan or a Star Wars fan.) I came to Star Trek by a much longer route, through the films, Wrath of Kahn is still my favorite, and eventually through my children. Continue reading

REVIEW: TMNT: Mutanimals #1

(IDW Publishing, 2015)

Written by Paul Allor
Artwork by Andy Kuhn
Color Artwork by Nick Filardi
Lettering by Shawn Lee

I haven’t seriously read TMNT in a while. I grew up on them and loved the toys, cartoons and comics. I have a lot of affection for them. I have flipped through the latest series every so often in my LCS and liked what I saw. I think TMNT are in a good place comic wise. At least from my limited perspective. So I am coming at Mutanimals from close to a blank slate. Continue reading

REVIEW: Last Breath

(Angry Eggman, 2013)

Written by Sam Eggleston
Pencils by Jason Baroody
Inks by Josh Oakes
Colors and Letters by John Hunt
Edits by Kim Eggleston

In 1969 the United States landed men on the surface of the moon. Anyone who was alive that day can tell you where they were, who they were watching it with, and how it made them feel. It was the end of JFK’s “space race”, and in that ending was the beginning of so many possibilities for the human race. 42 years later, that race would end for the U.S. with the dissolution of the shuttle program by NASA. Continue reading

REVIEW: King: Jungle Jim #1

(Dynamite Entertainment, 2015)

Written by Paul Tobin
Art by Sandy Jarrell
Letters by Marshall Dillon

Hey everyone! This week I took a look at Dynamite’s re-launch of Jungle Jim! And I have to say I rather enjoyed it. Not having read Jungle Jim before, the comic and all its characters are completely new to me. Therefore I am not going to write this review as a comparison of the two stories, but as a new comic that has never been seen before. Continue reading

Interview: Matt Miner

To introduce Matt Miner is to introduce the quintessential indie creator. Matt is a man who has figured out how to translate his passions into a specialized media outlet. He is a man who has strong opinions, and those opinions are not, at first glance, easily translated into a comic book.

His first series with Black Mask Studios, Liberator, focused on people who would go to any length to save animals from abuse. That book was popular enough to spawn two follow-up series, Liberator/Earth Crisis and Critical Hit. Matt’s latest book is called Toe Tag Riot, a zombie curse tale that cause the Westboro Baptist Church to label him an “insincere perv”.

Matt Miner was kind enough to answer a few questions for us regarding his many projects and what the future might hold for this indie comic creator. Continue reading

REVIEW: Matt Miner Double-Feature TTR#3 and Critical Hit #4

(Black Mask Studios, 2015)

Toe Tag Riot #3
Written by Matt Miner
Pencils, Inks, and Letters by Sean Von Gorman
Colors by Savanna Ganucheau

 Critical Hit #4
Written by Matt Miner
Pencils and Inks by Jonathan Brandon Sawyer
Colors by Doug Garbark
Letters by Jim Campbell

Multiple projects. It’s the wish and the curse of every working person. You want to stay busy and at the same time you feel so busy you can’t catch up. Continue reading

REVIEW: Imperium #1

(Valiant Entertainment, 2015)

Written by Joshua Dysart
Art by Doug Braithwaite
Colors by Brian Reber and Dave McCaig
Letters by Dave Sharpe

Being from a small town, the comics that mainly found my dollar were from the big 2. Once I got older and actually started going to comics shops, it was hard to turn away from those familiar titles and characters, to take a chance on a company that I didn’t recognize, whose books looked so different from what I grew up on. Continue reading

REVIEW: 566 Frames

(Borderline Press, 2013)

By Dennis Wojda

One cannot help but see reviews.  It’s the nature of the entertainment beast, of which I am a willing cog, that for every film trailer, book excerpt, or comic book PDF there will be a person tap-tapping away on his laptop, opining on a shadow in the corner or a too-closely-filled word balloon. At the same time, there is nothing better than being surprised and having your preconceived notions wonderfully smashed before your eyes.

Continue reading

REVIEW: And Then Emily Was Gone, Vol. 1

(ComixTribe, 2015)

Story by John Lees
Art by Iain Laurie
Colors by Megan Wilson
Letters by Colin Bell
Variant Covers by Riley Rossmo, Nick Pitarra,
Garry Brown, Joe Mulvey, and Cody Schibi

And Then Emily Was Gone is a horror story on more than one level. It is a creepy and utterly fantastic fairy tale set in modern day Scotland that explores several levels of the horror genre and taps into them with great success. This was, as far as I could tell, one of the most surprising hits of last year, and with that success comes good things for creators John Lees and Iain Laurie. Continue reading

REVIEW: ‘Toe Tag Riot’ #2

(Black Mask Studios, 2014)

Created by Matt Miner and Sean Von Gorman
Written by Matt Miner
Pencils and Inks by Sean Von Gorman
Colors by Savanna Ganucheau
Lettered by Sean Von Gorman

Confrontation has never been a place where I’ve felt comfortable.  Who knows the roots?  If my sister is reading this she’ll laugh and nod and say “Yup, that’s our family…”(Test here to see if she really reads these like she says she does…) Perhaps it is some form of latent Catholic guilt, rising up within at the sound of a raised voice, or maybe it’s the years Continue reading

REVIEW: ‘Cap Stone’ #1

(Titan Comics, 2014)

Writer: Liam Sharp & Christina McCormack
Artist: Liam Sharp

Story: The story focuses on Charlie Chance, the daughter to a playboy millionaire and gentleman thief who taught her all the tricks of the trade. As an adult, she’s now given up the lifestyle, but one big secret left behind by her father is about to come to back and haunt her. In the form of the titular character, Cap Stone, who’s suddenly gone missing. Continue reading

REVIEW: ‘Lone Ranger: Vindicated’ #1

(Dynamite Entertainment, 2014)

Story: Justin Gray
Art: Rey Villegas
Colours: Morgan Hickman
Letters: Simon Bowland

I didn’t follow Dynamite’s Lone Ranger comics which launched in 2006 and recently ended despite reading a number of positive reviews over the years and it was with some trepidation that I requested this #1 to review. I’ve been in the wilderness for a while and reviewing a first issue feels like a good jumping-in point Continue reading

REVIEW: ‘Men of Wrath’ #2

(Icon/Marvel Comics, 2014)

Written by Jason Aaron
Artwork by Ron Garney
Color Artwork by Matt Milla
Lettering by Jared K. Fletcher

Jason Aaron has never been one to shy away from violent subject matter and he certainly brings the brutality with his new series Men of Wrath from Marvels Icon imprint. Just two issues into the narrative and already this series rivals Aaron’s Image title Southern Bastards for family dysfunction and downright nastiness. Continue reading

REVIEW: ‘Outcasts of Jupiter’ #1

(Coker CoOp Books, 2014)

Written by Shobo Coker
Art by Shofela Coker

The abundance of crowd-funded comic books on the market today makes it nearly impossible to keep up.  It’s a constant complaint for me, not just with the indie market but with the standard market as well.  There are a lot of comic book to read, and you can’t always be on the front lines to see this stuff at its’ beginning. Continue reading